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Andrew Sorensen Keynote: "The Concert Programmer" - OSCON 2014

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From OSCON 2014: Is it possible to imagine a future where “concert programmers” are as common a fixture in the worlds auditoriums as concert pianists? In this presentation Andrew will be live-coding the generative algorithms that will be producing the music that the audience will be listening too. As Andrew is typing he will also attempt to narrate the journey, discussing the various computational and musical choices made along the way. A must see for anyone interested in creative computing. About Andrew Sorensen (QUT): Andrew Sorensen is an artist-programmer whose interests lie at the intersection of computer science and creative practice. Andrew is well known for creating the programming languages that he uses in live performance to generate improvised audiovisual theatre. He has been invited to perform these contemporary audiovisual improvisations around the world. Andrew is a Senior Research Fellow at the Queensland University of Technology and is the author of the Impromptu and Extempore programming language environments. Watch more from OSCON, O'Reilly's open source convention: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP Find out more about the convention: http://oscon.com Don't miss an upload! Subscribe! http://goo.gl/szEauh Stay Connected to O'Reilly Media by Email - http://goo.gl/YZSWbO Follow O'Reilly Media: http://plus.google.com/+oreillymedia https://www.facebook.com/OReilly https://twitter.com/OReillyMedia
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Text Comments (81)
Easily the most beautiiful talk I've ever watched.
Arron S (2 months ago)
Skip to 8:33 thank me later
What language/software are they using?
Squire Harding-Brown (1 year ago)
@ProjectFlexx (Twitter) Upcoming Rap Group https://soundcloud.com/user-993702066/cook-it-prod-justin-kase
gmmm (1 year ago)
Hii this is amazing! I was wondering whats the name of the color scheme in your vi editor? Thanks
Leonardo Comerci (1 year ago)
This is fucking epic. I'm programmer but I program in imperative languages, like PHP, Javascript and so on. This is LIPS. I wonder how much time would demand to learn it. And what time would demand to acquire the necessary music knowledge to start thinking the way this guy does... in order to create wonderful things in such a fluid way. He speaks of harmonics, scales, and many things and I almost don't know shit about it. That kind of sets me down because it gives me the sensation I cannot just start RIGHT AWAY doing pretty little things. I will have a double barrier here: LISP and its paradigm, and music knowledge itself.
Mario Cimet (1 year ago)
put some hours into it! I think you might be surprised at how fast you could progress
Dehan De Croos (1 year ago)
To be precise it is Extempore https://cecs.anu.edu.au/research/student-research-projects/extempore
Dean Margosa (2 years ago)
can i get the source file .wav without your voice i can make a beat to...but not with coding
Dmitriy Vasilyev (2 years ago)
oooor you could use cubase...
TheEndTrend (1 year ago)
Of course, but that's boring...if even you use a good DAW. :P
Bingo Du (2 years ago)
really amazing, incredible, thanks for sharing
Michael Eaton (2 years ago)
I love this
Rakan Alhneiti (2 years ago)
BEST KEYNOTE EVER! Absolutely stunning!
Brandon Toups (2 years ago)
what program is he typing in? the colorful one?
Rakan Alhneiti (2 years ago)
+Brandon Toups thats Emacs
Eric Mackrodt (2 years ago)
This is so awesome! I wanna play with it!
abhishek abhi (2 years ago)
thats rilly great. incredible
John Chung (2 years ago)
Wow...this is amazing.
Emily Williams (2 years ago)
really cool to look at music in terms of code rather than a linear scale. That song got so dramatic toward the 5 minute mark though. It was stressing me out! like I was at the climax of the most heart wrenching lifetime movie.
Moto Bene (3 years ago)
This the first time I've ever truly heard programming "SING". Simply beautiful.
Nhat Nguyen (3 years ago)
magic numbers, back to the basics
JD Espitia (3 years ago)
This is absolutely beautiful "May not music be described as the mathematics of the sense, mathematics as music of the reason? the Musician feels mathematics, the Mathematician thinks music: music the dream, mathematics the working life" James Sylvester.
Boien Reyes (3 years ago)
Hardcore! yeah
2010daigo1 (3 years ago)
I really like the sound of his keyboard. 
David Porter (3 years ago)
Does anyone know what editor he is using?
Shanthakumar (3 years ago)
#lisp
O'Reilly (3 years ago)
This year Andrew Sorensen captivated ‪#‎OSCON‬ attendees with a live musical performance powered by functional programming:
Jack Devine (4 years ago)
What text editor is he using?
Nabeel Molham (4 years ago)
I can't find the words !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Francisco Bernardo (4 years ago)
live commented coding! (Pardon the pun, ahahaha) Remarkable ;)
Ulrik Høyer Kold (4 years ago)
Wow, that was great ... I have to try this out. 
Clark Mitchell (4 years ago)
The color theme looks like Monokai but what is the emacs theme?
Does anyone recognize the editor?
powerline! that is why I did not recognize it. thx +Cristian Orellana :D
Cristian Orellana (2 years ago)
+Cédric Martínez Campos I definitely think it is emacs ... you might wanna check the powerline mode for emacs, it might make more sense then.
I work with Emacs everyday and this is certainly not it.
Ayush Goyal (2 years ago)
+Cédric Martínez Campos emacs
Saiful Bahri (4 years ago)
I'm absolutely inspired. Totally blows me away. It's like pure fusion of music + programming. I'm already googling this extempore he's using... =)
fuleo (4 years ago)
This is kinda inspiring. =)
asa channel (4 years ago)
good
ALOK KUMAR DIWAKAR (4 years ago)
This is pretty cool ^2 
Sai Bhargav Yalamanchi (4 years ago)
k
Can't wait for a Linux version of impromptu! Would totally listen to an Emacs DJ on a LUG meeting.
Vilius Kraujutis (4 years ago)
Programming live concert FTW. Nice!
Yuqiang Zheng (4 years ago)
I love th music.
Ali Khezeli (4 years ago)
Great. GREAT for the music of video games.
Kanshu Yokoo (4 years ago)
now I understood that composing music is more theoritical than intuitive.
shijing si (4 years ago)
So great!
Dexter dela iglesia (4 years ago)
this is really awesome!
Blaize D'souza (4 years ago)
This is Awesome!
Gabriel Basilio Brito (4 years ago)
Most original DJ ever ?
Xiao Hanyu (4 years ago)
oh my god, this is really awesome!
kkxmshu (4 years ago)
eargasm
Donald Zhan (4 years ago)
OMG! That's cool!
Gordon Anderson (4 years ago)
nice foo. I feel like two universes have just been welded together by a portal.
Carlos Pacheco (4 years ago)
live coding music! Wow! 
AlyC (4 years ago)
Awesome!
b4d17 (4 years ago)
What is the editor used?
O'Reilly (4 years ago)
*Andrew Sorensen at OSCON 2014* Is it possible to imagine a future where “concert programmers” are as common a fixture in the worlds auditoriums as concert pianists? In this presentation Andrew will be live-coding the generative algorithms that will be producing the music that the audience will be listening too. As Andrew is typing he will also attempt to narrate the journey, discussing the various computational and musical choices made along the way. A must see for anyone interested in creative computing. About Andrew Sorensen (QUT): Andrew Sorensen is an artist-programmer whose interests lie at the intersection of computer science and creative practice. Andrew is well known for creating the programming languages that he uses in live performance to generate improvised audiovisual theatre. He has been invited to perform these contemporary audiovisual improvisations around the world. Andrew is a Senior Research Fellow at the Queensland University of Technology and is the author of the Impromptu and Extempore programming language environments. Watch more from OSCON, O'Reilly's open source convention: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP Find out more about the convention: http://oscon.com/ http://youtu.be/yY1FSsUV-8c #OSCON   #oscon2014   #oscon14   #programming   #OReilly  
Jan-Philipp Heinrich (4 years ago)
I´m a self learner in Java and Python since two years now and to be true: It is sometimes hard when you see how much there is still to learn. But when I saw this, I have to say this is the most inspiring and beautiful thing I saw in the past two years. Thanks!
Ronnie Bermejo (4 years ago)
Inspiring
Joe Yankel (4 years ago)
Fantastic!
Gu Yifan (4 years ago)
SUPER COOL!
Martin (4 years ago)
good but the guys a pretentious cunt
PinchHarmonix (4 years ago)
You can achieve the same exact thing by learning to play a traditional musical instrument. You're using the wrong tool for the job. It's an inefficiency, or a redundancy which defeats the general philosophy behind programming in the first place.
Yassin Zao (2 years ago)
learning An music instrument is definitely needed if you want to do something with music... however having a computer composing pieces of music is amazing... you can combine pieces with a real instrument if you want.. you can built a whole symphony out of this...I don't think you will mange in your own.. or with one sort of instrument... right?... so this is where this kind of systems gets freaking handy... apart from the fun of programming if you like programming in clojure;)
Gu Yifan (4 years ago)
Art is not about "efficiency"
Alex McLean (4 years ago)
What's philosophy without music?
Ian B (4 years ago)
is this fucking lisp?
abbas ali chezgi (4 years ago)
live concert programming.
Nick Donais (4 years ago)
This is damn awesome. Love that this kind of thing exists, I love being a programmer =)
Random Geek (4 years ago)
It's nice to be reminded that computers can help you create beauty. Worth ten minutes of your time even if you aren't interested in the code part of it.
Random Geek (4 years ago)
I probably would have asked him to sign a socially unacceptable portion of my anatomy. It is for the best that I did not see it live.
VM Brasseur (4 years ago)
This was astonishing to watch live. The knowledge, skill, talent, and experience required to pull it off was mind blowing.
Roberto Selbach (4 years ago)
This is such an original talk. Not what you normally expect from a developers' conference. Beautiful :)
Hugo Lopes (4 years ago)
Really great! :) Does anyone know what fonts/characters are being used in the VIM powerline statusbar? I'm using the default triangle characters as separators but I liked these.
Juga Paazmaya (4 years ago)
Nice shirt!
somethingnevertaken (4 years ago)
Where can I get the source to this as a fun way to play with Lisp?
somethingnevertaken (4 years ago)
Thanks
Jaymz Rhime (4 years ago)
extempore is on github https://github.com/digego/extempore

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