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6 Deadliest Sea Snakes
 
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Evolving from Cobras, Sea Snakes have some of the most toxic and potent venom in the world, some can kill a thousand men in just a few drops. Subscribe for the latest videos: https://goo.gl/7xzjzR Here are 6 of the Deadliest Sea Snakes: 6 - The Yellow Bellied Sea Snake The yellow bellied sea snake is one of the most widely distributed snakes in the world and has been spotted as far north as Russia and as far south as New Zealand. Although they tend to avoid cold water, a few have been spotted of the coast of California during drastic weather changes such as el nino. The yellow belly gets its name from its distinct yellow lower half of its body with a black or brown upper body. The snake does not have many predators and the bright yellow colors warn others that it’s highly venomous. They are fairly docile, but may strike a human if picked up or handled roughly. Their venom is highly toxic and causes muscle pain, stiffness, droopy eyelids, drowsiness, vomiting, paralysis and if not treated quickly, death. 5 - The Beaked Sea Snake The Beaked Sea Snake, also known as the hook-nosed sea snake or common sea snake, can be found lurking at the bottom of the murky waters in estuaries and river mouths of the eastern Indian ocean. They are commonly found in the coastal islands of India and have been spotted near the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, and as far north as Vietnam, and as far south as Australia. The snake has a small head with a plump olive green upper body and bluish bands with a white belly. It gets its name from from having a distinct beak-like snout which is slightly curved downward.The beaked sea snake can dive as far as 100 meters below, and can remain underwater for up to hours and typically feeds on bottom feeders such as catfish. Their venom 8 times as potent as a cobra and one bite has enough toxicity to potentially kill 22 humans. Described to be “cantankerous and savage” by experts and is responsible for 90% of sea snake deaths. 4 - The Dubois' Seasnake The Dubois’ Seasnake, sometimes referred to as the Reef Shallows snake, can be found lurking in the coral reefs of Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. It’s color can range from salmon and beige to purple and brown with patterns of dark or cream colored bands and is typically just over 1 meter long. The snake can remain underwater for for up to two hours and is It’s diet consists of mostly small reef fish such as blennies, parrotfish, surgeonfish as well as moray eels. The Duboi’s Sea Snake is mildly tempered and will only strike a diver if threatened or mishandled. 3 - The Horned Sea Snake The Horned Sea Snake, also referred to as the Spiny-Headed Sea snake, is widely spread throughout the coast of Australia and Southeast Asia, but can also be found near in the waters of Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. While most sea snakes prey on a variety of small fish, an adult Horned Sea Snake feeds mainly on gobbies, while the young feed on shrimp. The horned Sea snake is also known to be one of the most venomous sea snakes in the world, although there have been no recorded bites on humans. 2 - Banded Sea Krait The Banded Sea Krait can be found in the tropical Western Pacific Seas and the Indian Ocean. The snake gets its name from having distinct black uniform stripes that cover its blueish grey body. It averages 35 inches in length, with a large paddle shaped tail adapted for water.The Banded Sea Krait’s venom is among some of the most toxic on earth and is 10 times more potent than that of a rattlesnake. The snake is well adapted for hunting in shallow waters and coral reefs, which it uses to its advantage in catching prey, which mostly consists of eel and small fish. Although it usually hunts alone, Banded Sea Krait’s have also been known to cooperate together in large numbers as a hunting party. But unlike most other sea snakes, the Banded Sea Krait spends much of its time on land. It will often leave the sea to seek freshwater, digest food, rest, lay eggs, and shed its skin - all on land.Because the snake frequents land so much, human encounters are far more common than other sea snake. Fortunately, the snake is most always docile, even when provoked, and will very rarely bite a human. 1 - Belcher’s Sea Snake The Belcher’s Sea Snake, sometimes referred to as the Faint- Banded Sea Snake, is the most venomous snake in the world. It is said that the snake’s venom is over 100 times that of a cobra, and just a few milligrams is capable of killing over 1,000 humans. It can be found off the coasts of Northern Australia and Southeast Asia, and is commonly present in the Philippines, New Guinea, and the Gulf of Thailand. Fortunately for humans, the Belcher’s Sea Snake is quite docile and has even been said to actually be quite friendly. They will almost never bite humans unless heavily provoked, and even when they do, it is estimated that about 3/4ths of all bites on humans are dry bites.
Views: 162445 What Lurks Below
Sea Snakes | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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Many people don't realize that there are snakes that live in the ocean. And believe it or not, they're actually considerably more venomous than land snakes! Jonathan travels to Australia and the Philippines to find these marine reptiles, and learns why they are almost completely harmless to divers. This is an HD upload of a segment previously released in season 3. ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** The sea snake is an animal surrounded in mystery—known for its incredibly powerful venom, but not much else. Just how dangerous are these marine reptiles? I have traveled to Queensland, Australia on a quest to learn about sea snakes. Here on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, sea snakes are fairly common. Lets go see if we can find one. I hit the water, grab my camera and head towards the sea floor. Today I’m diving on a little seamount called a coral Bommie. It’s a mini-mountain of coral sticking up from the bottom, but not quite reaching the surface. Near the top of the Bommie, thousands of small fish feed on plankton passing by in the current, but they stay close to the reef, because they are being watched by a big school of jacks who are on the prowl for food themselves. The bommie is covered in healthy coral that provides lots of nooks and crannies for the fish to hide if they need cover. On the other side of the bommie, a large school of snappers are also looking for something to eat, and keeping a safe distance from the jacks. As I swim along at the base of the bommie, I’m keeping my eyes open for a snake-like animal. The coral looks healthy and a Spinecheek anemonefish gives me a quick glance from the safety of her host anemone. But I keep scanning the bottom and at last I have found my quarry: an olive sea snake, the most common species around the Great Barrier Reef. It’s swimming along the bottom doing the same thing everything else is doing—looking for food. The sea snake is closely related to a land snake, except it has adapted for life underwater. When a sea snake flicks its tongue, it’s getting rid of excess salt secreted by special glands in its mouth. Sea snakes live exclusively in the ocean, but since they’re reptiles, their kidneys can’t deal with too much excess salt in their blood. A sea snake gets around with a flattened section of tail that looks like an oar and serves as a fin. It looks just like an eel when it swims, undulating its body and getting propulsion from that flattened tail. Although sea snakes prefer to eat fish, eels and shrimp, these snappers aren’t at all afraid of the sea snake, because they are way too big for the sea snake to bite. This snake is heading for the surface to grab a breath of air. A sea snake, just like a land snake, has lungs and must breathe air to survive. It can hold its breath up to 3 hours during a dive. Recent research has shown that some sea snakes also can absorb a little bit of oxygen directly from the water through their skin, which is probably why a breath can last so long. After spending a minute at the surface breathing, the sea snake comes back down to the bottom. It’s poking around, looking for holes where it might corner a fish or shrimp. It sticks its head into the holes, hoping to get lucky. The sea snake is most closely related to the Cobra on land, and its venom is quite similar to cobra venom, but considerably more potent. If it manages to grab a fish, the venom will kill it in seconds. Sea snakes quite often take a rest on the bottom, sleeping as they hold their breath. I use the opportunity to sneak up on one. In spite of their fearsome venom, sea snakes are very timid and not particularly aggressive. Although this one is obviously not thrilled about being picked up, it doesn’t try to bite me. And when I let go, it just swims away. I find another one and can’t resist the opportunity to show the flattened tail section. Swim, be free! Although the sea snake is one of the most venomous animals in the world, you’re not very likely to be bitten by one. There are 62 known species of sea snakes and they live all around the tropical Indo-Pacific. I found this banded sea snake in the Philippines. They like nice warm tropical water because they are cold-blooded, like all reptiles. If the water gets too cold, they get lethargic. So, no matter what you might think of snakes, sea snakes are timid and shy animals that represent almost no threat at all to people, even though they produce some of the most powerful venom in the world.
Views: 6177066 BlueWorldTV
Sea Snake Island | JONATHAN BIRD'S BLUE WORLD
 
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In this exciting adventure, Jonathan travels to Manuk, a tiny, uninhabited volcanic island several hundred miles from the nearest populated island in Indonesia, on a mission to discover why the waters of this remote place are teeming with thousands of venomous sea snakes! And if you love sea snakes, check out our adventure with sea snakes in Australia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gQY4m2HPYk ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can buy some Blue World T-shirts & Swag! http://www.blueworldtv.com/shop You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com ********************************************************************** Some of the world’s richest coral reefs thrive in Indonesia. Located in the middle of the so-called coral triangle, the diversity of species and colors of Indonesian reefs absolutely amazes me every time I get the chance to dive here. This time however, it’s not the reefs I have come to film, but a remote and uninhabited island whose waters are reputed to teem with thousands of sea snakes! The island, known as Manuk, is an active volcano a hundred kilometers from the nearest inhabited island, smack dab in the middle of the Indonesian archipelago. Getting there is no easy task. I have chartered the Seahorse, a traditional Indonesian Pinisi built for divers, for a special itinerary to reach Manuk Island. Divemaster Jandri meets me at the marina in Sorong. It took me 2 full days of flying just to get to Sorong from the United States! He takes me out to the Seahorse, my home away from home for the next two weeks. This expedition will take 14 divers 1200 miles across the Banda Sea, from Sorong to Alor, stopping to dive along the way at many islands, the most important of which of course is Manuk. The island is aptly named: Manuk means “bird” in several Indonesian dialects. And birds it has! Manuk is completely uninhabited and there are a few reasons why. First of all, it’s kind of steep. But more importantly, it’s an active volcano! There are steam and sulfur vents all over the island. It swims casually by flapping its flattened, paddle-like section of tail. Sea snakes are among the most venomous animals on Earth. They use this venom to hunt, and fortunately, attacks on people are extremely rare. Soon I start to see other sea snakes, and I realize that more and more have been appearing. Were they here before and I didn’t see them, or did they come out from someplace? Clearly, some were sleeping. This one is taking a nap in plain view on the reef. I guess they don’t really have to worry about predators. I watch this one sleep for a little while, and start to wonder if it’s even alive. Pretty soon I notice that as the snakes are waking up, they are coming over to check me out. Like land snakes, this is how a sea snake “smells” but at the same time, the tongue flicking helps get rid of excess salt from glands in its mouth. Because sea snakes are reptiles just like land snakes, they have lungs and need to breathe air just like people. So a sea snake must head to the surface every once in a while for a breath. Sea snakes have a huge lung that takes up nearly the entire length of their bodies so they can hold a big breath that will last a while. Each time a sea snake surfaces, it usually spends a minute or two resting and breathing, before gulping in that last big breath and diving back down to the reef. A breath can last 1-2 hours depending on the species, but most sea snakes breathe more often than that unless they are sleeping. They can also absorb a little bit of oxygen from the water directly through their skin, which helps them extend their dives. The next morning I’m up at sunrise, and heading out to the reef for an early morning dive. Early morning is when the sea snakes hunt, and I’m hoping to witness the reef alive with sea snakes on the prowl! Underwater, the light levels are still low, and I’m heading out to a deep seamount where I saw a lot of sea snakes yesterday. This should be a good place to find some sea snakes hunting. When a sea snake hunts, it takes advantage of having a small head and a thin body to go from hole to hole in the reef, poking its head inside. It hopes to corner a fish or invertebrate that’s hiding in the hole. Once the hunting starts, more sea snakes start coming in to the reef to join the hunt. On this seamount more than a hundred feet from the surface, dozens of sea snakes are gathering to prowl the reef for food. Sometimes, they appear to work together to make sure nothing escapes.
Views: 3343579 BlueWorldTV
DEADLY Sea Snake Encounter!
 
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Please SUBSCRIBE NOW! http://bit.ly/BWchannel Watch More - http://bit.ly/BTseacreatures On this episode Coyote discovers an extremely deadly Sea Snake marooned in a shallow tide pool! Capable of killing a human being with a single bite, the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake is one of the worlds most toxic reptiles! So when Coyote handles one for the first time he has to be more careful than EVER…one “slip” and it could be all over for him in the blink of an eye! Scary stuff! So will Coyote survive yet another deadly encounter or will his luck run out? Get ready to see what happens on this very first episode of Beyond the Tide! Our new series Beyond the Tide explores the mysterious world of the ocean and brings you closer than ever to its most fascinating creatures. Whether it’s tide pools, lagoons or the deepest depths of the sea Coyote Peterson and the Brave Wilderness crew will take you there! The Brave Wilderness Channel is your one stop connection to a wild world of adventure and amazing up close animal encounters! Follow along with adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they lead you on four exciting expedition series including the Emmy Award Winning Breaking Trail, Dragon Tails, Coyote’s Backyard and Beyond the Tide - featuring everything from Grizzly Bears and Crocodiles to Rattlesnakes and Tarantulas…each episode offers an opportunity to learn something new. So SUBSCRIBE NOW and join the adventure that brings you closer to the most beloved, bizarre and misunderstood creatures known to man! GET READY...things are about to get WILD! New Episodes Every Tuesday and Friday at 9AM EST Subscribe Now! https://www.youtube.com/BraveWilderness Find more info at: https://www.CoyotePeterson.com Coyote Peterson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson G+: https://plus.google.com/100310803754690323805/about
Views: 10729243 Brave Wilderness
Is Eating Venomous Sea Snakes a Bad Thing? | National Geographic
 
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The growing consumption of venomous sea snakes in Southeast Asia has resulted in the massive harvesting of these marine animals in the Gulf of Thailand. Fishermen and traders face a high risk of snakebites and even death as 80 tons of sea snakes are captured annually. Herpetologist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Zoltan Takacs documents this phenomenon while questioning the ecological and medical impact of this escalating wildlife trade. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #SeaSnakes #Venomous About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read more about the potential effects of this sea snake harvest: http://goo.gl/gKlTXE Follow Zoltan Takacs on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/DrZoltanTakacs/ RESEARCH/VIDEOGRAPHER: Zoltan Takacs SENIOR PRODUCER: Jeff Hertrick EDITOR: Jennifer Murphy ADDITIONAL RESEARCH: Kenny Broad EXPEDITION FUNDING: National Geographic Expeditions Council, National Geographic Explorer Programs, and University of Miami ADDITIONAL SUPPORT: Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology Is Eating Venomous Sea Snakes a Bad Thing? | National Geographic https://youtu.be/Foc4dn90n3E National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 4233520 National Geographic
11 Differences Between Eels & Sea Snakes
 
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11 differences between eels & sea snakes! From electric eels to venomous sea snakes (the most toxic sea snakes in the world), we'll highlight everything you need to know about these creatures. Type of animal Eels are a specific type of elongated fish and can be found in marine and freshwater environments. Sea snakes are reptiles and they are only found in marine environments. They are much flatter, in the vertical sense, than a snake. In addition, these fish’s heads tend to be longer and sharper. Eels also have fins, which sea snakes never have. Habitat Sea snakes are found throughout the coastal waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. They do not occur in the Red Sea, Atlantic Ocean, or Caribbean Sea. Most sea snakes live in shallow water less than 30 meters (100 feet) deep because they need to surface to breathe yet must seek their prey near the sea floor. However, the yellow-bellied sea snake may be found in the open ocean. Behavior Eels is an ambush predator, spending a considerable amount of time hidden in caves, rock crevices, or coral reefs. When a prey animal passes by, it pounces on it. Depending on the prey type, the eel might wrap itself around it, and crush the victim until it is small enough to be swallowed, or it might tear pieces from the body and eat the prey bite-by-bite. Sea snakes are generally reluctant to bite, and are usually considered to be mild-tempered, although variation is seen among species and individuals. Conservation status The European eel is a critically endangered species. Since the 1970s, the numbers of eels reaching Europe is thought to have declined by around 98%. Nostrils Nostrils of sea snakes are equipped with moveable valves that prevent water to enter the nose when they are under the water. The tubular nostrils spotted on eels are believed to help them detect prey. Size and diet Depending on the species, eels can grow to be anywhere between 4 inches to 11 1/2 feet long. However, most sea snakes grow to sizes between 3.9 to 4.9 feet long. Largest sea snake can reach 9.8 feet in length. Eels are carnivorous, meaning they are meat eaters. They eat a variety of animals such as worms, snails, frogs, shrimp, mussels, lizards and other small fish. Gills Eels have gills, as most other fish do, and filter air from the water in order to breathe. This means that they never have to go to the surface. Snakes, on the other hand, do not have gills, but lungs. Sea snakes can dive to the depth of 300 feet. On average, they dive for 30 minutes. Sea snakes can survive for more than 10 years in the wild. Mating season Mating season of sea snakes depends on the species. Only several species will lay eggs on the solid ground. Most species give birth to live snakes. Females give birth once in two year. he gestation period varies wildly, anywhere between 4 and 11 months, and is dependent on a number of factors, including abundance of food, water temperature and the age and health of the female. Once born, the young are on their own; the adults have no parental instincts at all. The number of babies ranges from couple to more than 25. Senses Sea snakes flick their tongues to gain chemical and thermal information about their environment. Sea snake tongues are shorter than those of regular snakes because it's easier to "taste" molecules in water than in air. There is no much information about sea snake vision, but it appears to play a limited role in catching prey and selecting mates. Scales The eel’s scales are much smaller and give the animal a smoother appearance, though. Sea snakes even have a special scale that let them feel movements in the water. They developed a scaly organ on their heads which lets them "see" underwater. The sensors, known as scale sensilla, are sensitive organs that protrude from scales on a snake's head. These head-organs facilitate awareness of water movements, but the extent of their awareness isn't well understood. Venom/Poisonous Sea snakes are almost always venomous, whether it is a mild venom or, in many cases, one of the most toxic. The most poisonous one is the Beaked Sea Snake. Just 3 drops of venom can kill about 8 people! Fortunately, these snakes have short fangs and they are unable to bite through diver’s suits very easily. Other than venom, some sea snakes produce enzyme that induces digestion of the prey from the moment of bite. Symptoms of sea snake poisoning include headache, stiffness, and muscle pain throughout the body. Thirst, sweating, vomiting, and a thick-feeling tongue may result. Muscle degradation and paralysis ensue. Death occurs if the muscles involved in swallowing and respiration are affected. Because bites are so rare, antivenin is next to impossible to obtain. Eels, on the other hand, are not venomous, but can deliver a nasty bite if you offer your hand. Further reinforcing the “don’t touch” creed divers should all know well!
Views: 4733 What Lurks Below
Five Facts about Sea Snakes
 
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During our cruise to the Pacific Islands this month I filmed Sea Snakes for the first time. It was a fascinating experience deserving of an interesting video.
Views: 136 DayDreamTV
Sea Snakes and Turtles - Reef Life of the Andaman - Part 20
 
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Sea Snakes and Sea Turtles. Part 20 of my DVD, "Reef Life of the Andaman", available at http://www.bubblevision.com/marine-life-DVD.htm or view the whole 2-hour video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ncUVddkK3Q In this video we look at the 3 most common marine reptiles in the Andaman Sea. First we meet the banded sea krait, Laticauda colubrina, a type of sea snake, hunting for prey at Shark Cave in the Mergui Archipelago in Burma (Myanmar), and in and around the Similan Islands in the Andaman Sea of Thailand. The banded sea krait's venom is extremely poisonous but they usually ignore scuba divers and their mouths are very small. There are two common types of sea turtle to be found in the Andaman Sea. First we encounter the Pacific hawsbill turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, which can be found on many dive sites in Thailand and Burma. Then in the Similan Islands we find the green turtle, Chelonia mydas. Turtles have a wide-ranging diet that includes cnidarians such as jellyfish and coral polyps. Sadly many sea turtles die by choking on or being poisoned by man-made debris such as plastic bags which they mistake as food. At Donald Duck Bay in the Similan Islands, we witness snorkellers hand-feeding one of the green turtles which hang around moored boats in search of food. As reptiles, both sea snakes and sea turtles must surface to breathe regularly before returning to the sea bed to hunt or rest. The following closed captions/subtitles are available by clicking the CC button under the video: NARRATION / COMMENTARY: - English - German (Deutscher Kommentar) - Spanish (Narración en Español) MARINE LIFE & DIVE SITE NAMES - Dutch (Nederlandse Namen) - English - German (Deutsche Bezeichnungen) - Thai ( ชื่อภาษาไทย & จุดดำน้ำ ) Please get in touch with me if you would like to help translate the narration or marine life names into other languages. I have more scuba diving videos and underwater footage on my website at: http://www.bubblevision.com I post updates about my videos, and interesting underwater videos from other filmmakers here: http://www.facebook.com/bubblevision http://www.twitter.com/nicholashope The video was shot by Nick Hope with a Sony VX2000 DV camera in a Gates housing. It was edited in Sony Vegas Pro then deinterlaced with QTGMC and upscaled to 720p HD in AviSynth. Thanks to Santana Diving of Phuket (http://www.santanaphuket.com), to Daniel Bruehwiler and Elfi and Uli Erfort for the German translation, and to Frank Nelissen for the Dutch subtitles. Full list of marine reptiles and dive sites featured in this video: 00:00 Banded Sea Krait, Laticauda colubrina, Shark Cave 00:52 Banded Sea Krait, Laticauda colubrina, Koh Bon 01:02 Banded Sea Krait, Laticauda colubrina, East of Eden 01:20 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, East of Eden 01:28 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Koh Bida Nok 01:34 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Maya Bay, Phi Phi Leh 01:45 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Black Rock 01:55 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Elephant Head Rock 02:04 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Maya Bay, Phi Phi Leh 02:16 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Koh Bida Nok 02:31 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Richelieu Rock 02:47 Pacific Hawksbill Turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata bissa, Koh Bon 03:00 Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, East of Eden 03:32 Green Turtle, Chelonia mydas, Donald Duck Bay 04:39 Harlequin Shrimp, Hymenocera picta, Koh Ha
Views: 229065 Bubble Vision
The adaptations of sea snakes - The Wonder of Animals: Episode 11 Preview - BBC Four
 
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SUBSCRIBE to the OFFICIAL BBC YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2IXqEIn LAUNCH BBC iPlayer to access Live TV and Box Sets: https://bbc.in/2J18jYJ Programme website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04m9r3s Most species of sea snakes spend their entire lives in the ocean.
Views: 113077 BBC
Sea Snake vs Moray Eel | The battle of 2 killer in the ocean | Giant Lion TV
 
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Sea Snake vs Moray Eel | The battle of 2 killer in the ocean | Giant Lion TV ► About GIANT LION TV: - SUBSCRIBE for more great wildlife clips: https://goo.gl/iaZgRc - NEW Uploads: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-LmGwht15X0T2svMwt2dUw/videos - POPULAR uploads: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-LmGwht15X0T2svMwt2dUw/videos?view=0&sort=p&flow=grid ▮ FACEBOOK Fanpage: https://goo.gl/53unus ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ ►►►►►►►►► THANKS FOR WATCHING ◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄ ▮ LIKE, COMMENTS AND SUBSCRIBE to support us Thank you!
Views: 470107 Giant Lion TV
YBS Lifestyle Ep 15 - BIGGEST VENOMOUS SEA SNAKE EVER | First Adventure On Our Mothership
 
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Join Brodie and the Moss family as they adventure 40+ kms offshore to a remote island in the new but old YBS mothership. Crayfish, Squid, good times and free swimming with what could be the biggest Sea Snake of it's kind in the world! Hit that play button, like it and subscribe if you want more! Cheers. Support our channel + get exclusive perks https://www.patreon.com/youngbloods Get YBS products at https://youngbloods.co/ Follow us https://www.instagram.com/ybsofficial/ https://www.instagram.com/brodiemoss/ https://www.facebook.com/youngbloodsspearfishing
Views: 637588 Youngbloods
Born to Be Wild: Observing the 'tigwaw' or sea snakes in Snake Island, Bohol
 
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Aired: (March 10, 2018): Unlike Doc Ferds' first visit in Snake Island in Bohol, only few “tigwaw” or sea snakes appeared during his second underwater observation. Find out the reason behind the decreasing population of tigwaw. Watch ‘Born to be Wild’ every Sunday, hosted by Doctor Nielsen Donato and Doctor Ferds Recio. Subscribe to us! http://www.youtube.com/user/GMAPublicAffairs?sub_confirmation=1 Find your favorite GMA Public Affairs and GMA News TV shows online! http://www.gmanews.tv/publicaffairs http://www.gmanews.tv/newstv
Views: 142444 GMA Public Affairs
Can Venomous Sea Snakes Help Us Find Miracle Cures? | The Blue Realm | Wild Things Documentary
 
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Blue Realm is a natural history television series about amazing creatures of the sea. Utilizing superb High-Definition imagery, engaging stories, and leading marine scientists the series takes viewers on extraordinary journeys of discovery! The waters of Papua, New Guinea and Australia's Great Barrier Reef are among the richest on Earth. Harbouring an exceptional variety of venomous fish, reptiles and invertebrates, their coral reefs conceal frightening secrets. The poisons of these animals are some of the most lethal known to man, but they also hold enormous potential in the development of new medicines. Content licensed by: Cana Media Click here for more documentaries: http://bit.ly/2gSPaf6 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/wildthingschannel INSTA: https://www.instagram.com/wildthingschannel/ Any queries, please contact us at: [email protected]
Views: 3775 Wild Things
sea snake attack
 
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SailRockDiversResort. Thailand. Koh Phangan, Chaloklum Considered the premier dive site in the Gulf of Thailand, Sail Rock is a pinnacle which rises to 15m above and 40m below the surface. Sail Rock lies between Koh Phangan and Koh tao. It's famous for its natural underwater vertical swim through or chimney which divers can enter at 6 metres and exit at 18. It is also the visiting site of many larger pelagic fish including chevron barracuda, big schools of mackerel, jacks, trevally and tuna. You may encounter a seasonal whale shark with over 40 spotted at Sail Rock in 2012 alone. Giant moray eels and lion fish have also taken up residency. The Trigger fish are also very playful during their nesting period! http://sailrockdiversresort... http://idcgopro.com http://hinbhairesort.com Music by Audimachine
Views: 143052 SailRockDailyNews
Eagle vs. Sea Snake | National Geographic
 
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A sea eagle snatches a venomous sea snake from the water. http://video.nationalgeographic.com/?source=4001 ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #Eagles #SeaSnakes About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Eagle vs. Sea Snake | National Geographic https://youtu.be/Xf240LcsPno National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 2783761 National Geographic
Sea Snake Facts: 10 Facts about Sea Snakes
 
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Here are 10 facts about sea snakes to help gain an understanding of this fascinating and amazing creature All images used courtesy of wikipedia Videos used under creative commons license Snake Pit, Grande Barrière de Corail, Australie by Antoni Belmas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKV2-IBZz60 NEW Diving with sea snake in Thailand Aquagrils Underwater by AQUA GRİLS Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjmlzPw_YA8 Synopsis Sea snakes are some of the most venomous sea creatures in the oceans. They use their powerful venom to defend themselves against attacks although they are not aggressive by nature. If one is bitten by a sea snake, the symptoms include generalized aching, stiffness, and tenderness of muscles all over the body. This can later lead to paralysis and some bites may result in death if they are not treated quickly. There are currently 62 species of sea snake and they can measure between 3.9 to 4.9 feet long. They largest sea snake can reach 9.8 feet in length. Their color and patterns on their bodies depend on the species and can be an assortment of colours from black, red, white, grey or blue. Although there are some species which are uniformly coloured. They are extremely adept swimmers and swim very quickly however when traversing dry land they are very clumsy movers. Sea snakes have moveable valves that stop water from getting into their noses and they have the ability to get rid of salt from their bodies which is excessive. Many sea snakes just prefer to swim in the shallow water and they are able to dive for up to an hour without coming up to the surface for breath. On average they will be underwater for up to 30 mins before returning to the surface. They are able to breathe whilst using their lungs and through their skin. Sea snakes are carnivores whose diet mainly consists of varying types of eggs, fish, mollusks and crustaceans. Sea snakes are able to live up to 10 years in the wild and they will mate at different times of the year. They will lay their eggs on the ground to hatch after a gestation period of usually around 9 months. They are able to give birth to up to 25 young.
Views: 24144 Stand Out Facts
Deadly Swimming Snake Hunts Underwater For Fish | Wildest Europe
 
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See how the Golden Jackal hunts fish in the Danube Delta, and the amazing swimming snake that can hunt underwater for up to 10 minutes at a time. Subscribe to Discovery UK for more great clips: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=DiscoveryTV Follow Discovery UK on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/DiscoveryUK
Views: 1095505 Discovery UK
Octonauts The Sea Snakes
 
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Octonauts and the Sea Snakes - Storyline (Octonauts and the Sea Snakes): Dashi discovers that the is being threatened by a whirlpool and . Octonauts: The Octonauts And The Sea Snakes [new] Want to join our next mission? Click here to Subscribe: Creature Report - Showing the amazing facts about the Sea Snake The Octonauts . Want to join our next mission? Click here to Subscribe: When Tunip discovers mysterious eggs in the garden pod, it isn't long before the .
Views: 201075 Jeff Moss
We found a SEA SNAKE NURSERY ft Sea Snakes
 
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Please SUBSCRIBE - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBrWSsW1poMy4jkygM3fODg In this episode: Jack is teaming up with Lauren Dibbon, a scientist studying sea snakes in the Mining town of Wiepa, on Cape York Peninsula, Queensland. There is a unique sea snake nursery in the Mission River and Lauren is worried about the impacts of the mining development. The best way to spot sea snakes is a night so the guys must be super prepared… The term ‘sea snakes’ covers snakes that spend their lives in the water. They can be both venomous and non-venomous so extra care must be taken when handling. There is a lot of research still to be done on sea snakes. *DISCLAIMER* Jack Randall has extensive experience handling and studying wild animals. Where filming with dangerous animals Made in the Wild works with scientists and wildlife institutions. Do not attempt to handle wild animals without appropriate training and permits. Venom Australia: Venom Australia is a mission to spot 20 venomous creatures out in the wild. Along the way we meet with scientists, experts and conservationists to find out everything there is to know about Venom. Thank you to Lauren Dibbon for sharing her time and research with us! To find out more about Lauren Dibbon: https://ecotone.com.au/ecologists/ To find out more about mining in Weipa: http://mininglink.com.au/site/weipa Credits: Creator: Jack Randall Producer: Suzie Brearley Director of Photography: Jennifer Stock Editor: Catarina Oliveira Graphics: Mike Wyatt Music: Josh Brown Colourist: James Kellett Smith Drop Intro: Michael Brearley Special Thanks to Lauren Dibbon RESEARCH MISSIONS! JOIN THE ADVENTURE https://madeinthewild.tv/go-wild/ BE CURIOUS! CHECK OUT OUR OTHER SERIES https://madeinthewild.tv/be-curious/ Follow Made in the Wild on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/madeinthewi... Follow Made in the Wild on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/madeinthewil... BE CURIOUS GET ADVENTUROUS GO WILD
Views: 290 Made in the Wild
Man Catches The World's Most Dangerous Snake
 
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Subscribe to StoryTrender: http://bit.ly/StoryTrenderSubscribe Watch more: http://bit.ly/StoryTrenderPicks Submit your video here: http://bit.ly/StoryTrender ----------------------------------------------- Subscribe for more: http://smarturl.it/CatersNews These are the incredible pictures of one man’s remarkable encounter with THE WORLD’S MOST DANGEROUS SNAKE. Forrest Galante, with girlfriend Jessica Evans, travelled around the South Pacific and Indonesia in search of the region’s most beautiful and dangerous wildlife. Their, they encountered Banded Sea Kraits. With venom ten times stronger than a Cobra's, Banded Sea Kraits are the most venomous snakes in the world and extremely dangerous. Forrest's first encounter took place while spearfishing for their dinner off a remote island in Vava'u, Tonga. Director: Forrest Galante Editor: Emma Baker About us: We bring you the weirdest, wackiest and most bizarre stories from around the world. Stay tuned for daily uploads that you simply have to see to believe. Find us online: Twitter: https://twitter.com/caters_news Video Twitter: https://twitter.com/caters_video Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catersnews Website: www.catersnews.com Welcome to Storytrender - the home of extraordinary video. We are dedicated to unearthing amazing UGC video and telling the stories behind them. Our team of journalists scour the web 24/7 to licence the latest trending videos before they go viral. We then package these up into bitesize news clips for the YouTube community. Stay tuned for verified, engaging and extraordinary stories uploaded daily. *To use or license this video please contact [email protected]* Connect with Storytrender: Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/StoryTrender Like our Facebook: www.facebook.com/StryTrndr Visit our website: www.storytrender.com Company Information: Storytrender is owned and operated by Caters News Agency Ltd, an international multimedia content provider. We supply news, picture, video and feature stories to the world’s largest media publishers. All videos aired on this channel have been licensed from their rightful owners. For media / licensing / broadcast usages, please contact [email protected] www.catersnews.com
Views: 68140 StoryTrender
Snake Documentary National History New Zealand Limited - Sea Serpents (Documentary)
 
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Snake Documentary National History New Zealand Limited - Sea Serpents (Documentary) Documentary about sea serpents. Enjoy! Subscribe & More Videos: https://goo.gl/HnnsKG Thank for watching, Please Like Share And SUBSCRIBE!!! #venom, #history
Views: 6592 Kine Pat
VENOMOUS SEA SNAKE Cooked Two Ways 海蛇 / 海の蛇 / 바다뱀 - Vietnam Seafood Street Food
 
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This is one of the most extraordinary street food experience I have had in Vietnam, that is, sea snake. A fresh sea snake was taken out of the fish tank and ready for cooking. A skilled man cleaned and processed the sea snake first. After that, 3-4 kitchen staffs made the amazing fried roll from the sea snake. This is extraordinary Vietnam street food I would say. This seafood street food of sea snake in Vietnam is so tasty. You can feel the sweet of snake meat and bones together in the roll. They mixed internal parts of the snake into alcohol to make a drink too. Having this snake street food with that drink is a hell of experience. I would come back this place for more wonderful street food in Vietnam. ➤ Subscribe for new episode of Vietnamese street food every week. ➤ Follow my personal FB: https://www.facebook.com/RawStreetCapture101
Views: 982051 Raw Street Capture 101
Shark Vs. Sea Snake
 
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http://www.morningstarr.co.uk/forum/natter/29035-shark-vs-snake.html#post293947 This is a great video taken by a camera on the Great Barrier Reef.
Views: 20445969 The Morningstarr*
Old Woman Is Master Sea Snake Catcher! | Wild Japan | BBC
 
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Subscribe to BBC Earth: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSubBBC Earth YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCEarth BBC Earth Facebook http://www.facebook.com/bbcearth (ex-UK only) BBC Earth Twitter http://www.twitter.com/bbcearth Visit http://www.bbc.com/earth/world for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos This is a channel from BBC Studios who help fund new BBC programmes.
Views: 916993 BBC Earth
Cottonmouth vs Water Snake!
 
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Please SUBSCRIBE - http://bit.ly/BWchannel Watch More - http://bit.ly/BTgatorvscroc On this episode of Breaking Trail, Coyote is back in the swamp to show you the differences between a Water Moccasin and a Banded Water Snake! Easily confused for one another, these two snakes are worlds apart in terms of their danger factor toward humans. However in order to show you how to tell the deadly viper apart from the harmless Colubridae Coyote must catch one of each which is going to be a whole lot easier said, than done…good thing our wildlife biologist Mario Aldecoa is back in the field to help with the search! Get ready…this is Cottonmouth vs Water Snake! HUGE THANKS to Dr. Jimmy Smith and Wyatt Smith for hosting the crew at The Retreat at Artesian Lakes - please visit their website to book a relaxing vacation in South Texas http://bit.ly/artesianlakes Breaking Trail leaves the map behind and follows adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they encounter a variety of wildlife in the most amazing environments on the planet! The Brave Wilderness Channel is your one stop connection to a wild world of adventure and amazing up close animal encounters! Follow along with adventurer and animal expert Coyote Peterson and his crew as they lead you on three exciting expedition series - Emmy Award Winning Breaking Trail, Dragon Tails and Coyote’s Backyard - featuring everything from Grizzly Bears and Crocodiles to Rattlesnakes and Tarantulas…each episode offers an opportunity to learn something new. So SUBSCRIBE NOW and join the adventure that brings you closer to the most beloved, bizarre and misunderstood creatures known to man! GET READY...things are about to get WILD! New Episodes Every Tuesday and Friday at 9AM EST Subscribe Now! https://www.youtube.com/BraveWilderness Find more info at: https://www.CoyotePeterson.com Coyote Peterson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson G+: https://plus.google.com/100310803754690323805/about
Views: 31041048 Brave Wilderness
Amazing poisonous Sea Snake Survives From Fishing Net -Amazing Video 2017
 
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Amazing poisonous Sea Snake Survives From Fishing Net -Amazing Video 2017 The Hydrophiinae, also known as coral reef snakes or sea snakes, are a subfamily of venomous elapid snakes that inhabit marine environments for most or all of their lives. Most are extensively adapted to a fully aquatic life and are unable to move on land, except for the genus Laticauda, which has limited land movement. They are found in warm coastal waters from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific and are closely related to venomous terrestrial snakes in Australia. All have paddle-like tails and many have laterally compressed bodies that give them an eel-like appearance. Unlike fish, they do not have gills and must surface regularly to breathe. Along with whales, they are among the most completely aquatic of all air-breathing vertebrates. Among this group are species with some of the most potent venoms of all snakes. Some have gentle dispositions and bite only when provoked, but others are much more aggressive. Currently, 17 genera are described as sea snakes, comprising 62 species Most Hydrophiinae are completely aquatic and have adapted to their environments in many ways, the most characteristic of which is a paddle-like tail that has improved their swimming ability. To a varying degree, the bodies of many species are laterally compressed, especially in the pelagic species. This has often caused the ventral scales to become reduced in size, even difficult to distinguish from the adjoining scales. Their lack of ventral scales means they have become virtually helpless on land, but as they live out their entire lifecycles at sea, they have no need to leave the water. The only genus that has retained the enlarged ventral scales is the sea kraits, Laticauda, with only five species. These snakes are considered to be more primitive, as they still spend much of their time on land, where their ventral scales afford them the necessary grip. Laticauda species are also the only sea snakes with internasal scales, i.e., their nostrils are not located dorsally. Since it is easier for a snake's tongue to fulfill its olfactory function under water, its action is short compared to that of terrestrial snake species. Only the forked tips protrude from the mouth through a divided notch in the middle of the rostral scale. The nostrils have valves consisting of a specialized spongy tissue to exclude water, and the windpipe can be drawn up to where the short nasal passage opens into the roof of the mouth. This is an important adaptation for an animal that must surface to breathe, but may have its head partially submerged when doing so. The lung has become very large and extends almost the entire length of the body, although the rear portion is thought to have developed to aid buoyancy rather than to exchange gases. The extended lung possibly also serves to store air for dives.
Views: 31820 Village Food Village
Sea snakes group hunting
 
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Venomous banded sea kraits hunt small fish on a coral reef by chasing them into crevices. By cooperating with yellow goatfish and trevally, which scare the prey into crevices, the snakes can hunt more effectively. This clip was first created on the Planet Earth website: bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/planetearth/.
Views: 55214 Kirikan Kuu
Venomous sea snake washes ashore
 
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A Ventura County, California, surfer made a strange discovery when he stumbled upon a venomous yellow-bellied sea snake.
Views: 65060 CNN
SEA SNAKE in Boracay Philippines!
 
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Snorkeling is fun but seeing a sea snake while snorkeling??? Here's our crazy experience snorkeling in Boracay Island Philippines! underwater/action camera: https://amzn.to/2FUu9tw snorkeling mask: https://amzn.to/2HY17Pt Music: Let Them Laugh by Vexento https://soundcloud.com/vexento https://www.youtube.com/user/Vexento
FISHING FOR SEA SNAKES!
 
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FISHING FOR SEA SNAKES: We went fishing in the Newport Bay! Shay caught the only cool thing... Get our gear here - www.gethushin.com Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/user/hushinwithlavere?feature=watch My twitter https://twitter.com/#!/caseylavere My Facebook http://www.facebook.com/pages/Caseylavere/192307430825970 Edited by Jared Kowalczyk --- caseylavere, deep sea fishing, fishing, shaycarl, sontard, wolf eel, Newport Bay, Maker Studios, free video, fishing video, hushingwithlavere, sea snakes, golden valley jerky
Views: 4008056 Hushin
Sea Snake feeding frenzy!
 
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In this excerpt from season 4 of Jonathan Bird's Blue World, sea snakes are hunting in a group in Indonesia! To see the entire segment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rqcigdJi3o ********************************************************************** If you like Jonathan Bird's Blue World, don't forget to subscribe! You can join us on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/BlueWorldTV Twitter https://twitter.com/BlueWorld_TV Instagram @blueworldtv Web: http://www.blueworldTV.com **********************************************************************
Views: 15739 BlueWorldTV
Roving Gang of Sea Snakes & Fish Terrorize Reef
 
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Sea snakes and reef fish help each other snag an easy meal. Please LIKE and SUBSCRIBE if you enjoyed! http://bit.ly/1Adl6ht **More info & videos below** "Perfect Partners" premieres May 11, 2016 on PBS. Check local listings. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/perfect-partners-about/14189/ Lethal sea kraits (snakes) are too slow to catch fish in a straight chase. Fortunately, they have partners in crime - shoals of yellow goatfish and trevally who seek similar prey. The big fish scare the prey into the cracks where the sea snakes can catch them. --------------- For full NATURE episodes, check out http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pbsnature/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/pbsnature/ Tumblr: http://pbsnature.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/pbs_nature/ ----------------- Nature is a production of THIRTEEN for PBS. Throughout its history, Nature has brought the natural world to millions of viewers. The PBS series has been consistently among the most-watched primetime series on public television. ----------------- More videos: Sea otter orphan gets adopted: https://goo.gl/GKwveM Owl silent flight: https://goo.gl/p0gyTA Bullfrog dad protects tadpoles: https://goo.gl/3eoViH Gorilla mating games: https://goo.gl/BA3KoU Snow Monkeys behind the scenes: https://goo.gl/Jru3yv
Views: 6982 Nature on PBS
Sea Snakes feeding at Reef HQ Aquarium
 
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The Sea Snakes at Reef HQ Aquarium get fed twice a week. You can see by this video that they are really enthusiastic about it! Music: "December Nights" by cdk (feat. Fourstones) http://ccmixter.org/files/cdk/34714 is licensed under a Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 20199 Reef HQ Aquarium
Sea Snakes Of Marion Reef
 
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The sea snake, serpent of the sea, is a highly venomous creature, its venom is ten times more potent than the cobra. Many native fishermen die from sea snake bites in the islands north of Australia, but, fatalities are rare in Australia. The sea snake does give its victim a chance to survive. It mouths its prey before it bites. The venom is slow to take effect, but, without treatment it causes flaccid paralysis - the victim simply goes to sleep and dies. Marion Reef is a coral atoll in the Coral Sea, 200 miles off the central Queensland coast, and home to a variety of sea snake species. Its blue waters are unbelievably clear - 50 metres visibility is the norm. The corals are luxuriant, sharks present, and its coral islands are like emeralds in a rainbow sea. Its’ a Garden of Eden with its own special serpent. Marine scientists accompany Ben Cropp on his vessel “Freedom” to Marion Reef. A great deal is yet to be learnt about the behavior of sea snakes. Tagging is one scientific program on the expedition’s agenda - a dangerous and dramatic program for it brings out the worst in the sea snakes. They are angry when captured and even angrier when tagged and released, often venting that anger by attacking the diver. Mating time is another dangerous moment for scientific observation. The snakes entwine in a rhythmic courtship and resent any intrusion. Ben Cropp has experienced their aggression when moving too close with his camera, and had to fight off a most persistent attack. Otherwise, without human intervention, sea snakes appear to live a placid life in the coral lagoon, surfacing for air perhaps every half hour. Their enemies are few - mostly sharks and groper - and their fish prey plentiful which they hunt with myopic vision. It’s the myopic vision which makes the sea snake boldly and blindly attack when molested, or curiously crawl over a diver if he freezes. The latter is the better way to meet the sea snake at close quarters, if the diver has the courage to keep very still. This film is a scientific adventure into a remote area of the Coral Sea, revealing the special life of the serpent of the sea. [email protected]
Views: 7129 Ben Cropp
Sea Snake
 
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The most venomous snake in the world, just 1 drop of this snake's venom is enough to kill several divers. Sea snakes have a special flattened tail different from other snakes which allow them to swim through the water extremely fast. Subscribe to Epic Wildlife http://goo.gl/6rzs5u Let's Connect -- http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/ -- http://www.facebook.com/epicadamwildlife -- http://www.twitter.com/epicwildlife -- http://gplus.to/epicwildlife
Views: 40775 Epic Wildlife
Octonauts and the yellow bellied sea snakes
 
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When a mass of poisonous sea snakes get stranded on a beach, peso and the octonauts must somehow get them all back into the ocean.
Views: 732865 Mac Roger
Watch: Sea Snake Swallows Eel Whole | National Geographic
 
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This video taken by a diving instructor in Thailand showcases a sea snake, known as a banded sea krait, in its element: swallowing a moray eel as big as it is. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Click here to read more about this deadly encounter. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/02/banded-sea-krait-snake-moray-eel-reefs/ Watch: Sea Snake Swallows Eel Whole | National Geographic https://youtu.be/spB1ElbnyPw National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 122194 National Geographic
Yellow Sea Snake (Pelamis platura ?)  returns  to the Ocean
 
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Walking along the shores of the Golfo Dulce, in Puerto Jimenez, I found this nice specimen of a yellow sea snake that had been landed by the big waves of the night storm. I took a wooden stick and pushed it back the ocean, were he start to swim again. these Snakes are quite venomous, but the size of their mouth is so small that they can bite a person only in two places, in between the fingers of the feet and in the external part of the hears....really few chances to get poisoned......http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelamis_platura
Views: 43648 Giulio Ranalli
A Poisonous Sea Snake!!!!
 
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Amazing Banded Sea Krait!!!
HD Underwater Stock Footage For Sale - Banded Sea Snakes
 
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FOR SALE: HD footage of Banded Sea Snakes. To license this video footage please email [email protected] 1 Video FIle - 20 GBP 20% discount when ordering 20+ video files 50% off when ordering 40+ video files
Views: 3578 Fat Fish Movies
Creature Feature: Swimming With Sea Snakes
 
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Encounters with the Banded Sea Krait of Niue Island in the waters of the South Pacific. Find out more at https://www.meettheocean.org.
Views: 606 Meet the Ocean
Water Snake Island!
 
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Please SUBSCRIBE NOW! http://bit.ly/BWchannel Coyote Peterson lives for adventure and for him kayaking to a remote island that is home to thousands of snakes is the perfect way to spend a day at the beach! North Bass Island is a sanctuary for one of the rarest snakes on the planet, the Lake Erie Water Snake. Once nearly pushed to the edge of extinction these snakes are now rebounding back on the Erie Islands and are proving to be one of the most beneficial species to their island ecosystems. Beautiful, fast and challenging to capture, Coyote will have his hands full as he attempts to avoid the onslaught of bites from this feisty reptile! Breaking Trail leaves the map behind and follows adventurer and animal enthusiast Coyote Peterson and his crew as they explore a variety of wildlife in the most amazing environments throughout North America!  Watch More Breaking Trail: https://www.animalist.com/breakingtrail Subscribe Now! https://www.youtube.com/user/BreakingTrail Find more info at: https://www.CoyotePeterson.com Coyote Peterson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/COYOTEPETERSON Coyote Peterson on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoyotePeterson Coyote Peterson G+: https://plus.google.com/100310803754690323805/about
Views: 925131 Brave Wilderness
Sea Snake eating Moray Eel, Fiji (Laticauda colubrina vs. Gymnothorax sp.)
 
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The banded snake krait (Laticauda colubrina) videotaped feeding on an eel (Gymnothorax sp.) in Fiji. Location was a patch reef off Pacific Harbour at a depth of about 30'. The krait had already killed the eel and was swallowing it when my wife, Marj Awai, found it. Bruce Carlson video. [taxonomy:binomial=Laticauda colubrina]
Views: 136228 exallias
Sea Snake in Bali
 
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While we were paddleboarding during our trip to Bali, we came across this cool elephant trunk snake. Get an up close look at it as we follow it through the water.
Views: 2023 The Wild Brothers
The Sea Snake
 
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The Sea Snake. Caesar and Brutus were the best of friends, right? Let's turn back the clocks to 44 B.C., during the Roman Empire, where Julius Caesar and his bro, Brutus are having a lovely chat! Welcome to the ides of March! Et tu, Brute??? Be Sure To Subscribe to Studio C ► https://goo.gl/ppFsJP Bring on the laughs! Sketch comedy for everyone. Watch Studio C on YouTube. Top 15 Most Viewed Studio C Videos: https://goo.gl/FKrMuW Season 8: Season 7: https://goo.gl/CSsghg Season 6: https://goo.gl/CYaQDG Season 5: http://goo.gl/jo8k4z Season 4: https://goo.gl/KUBK3e Season 3: https://goo.gl/W3ncbe Season 2: https://goo.gl/Swq4qh Season 1: https://goo.gl/VeQdXX Studio C YouTube Exclusives: https://goo.gl/pQ2b38 Watch Studio C Mondays at 9pm ET/7pm MT on BYUtv or online here: http://byutv.org/studioc Like Studio C on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StudioCtv Follow Studio C on Instagram: http://instagram.com/studioctv Follow Studio C on Twitter: https://twitter.com/StudioC_tv Post with our official hashtag! #StudioC Cast: Whitney Call, Matt Meese, Stephen Meek and Aaron Fielding Director: Jed Wells Producer: Luiz Malaman Line Producer: Tess Kelly Writer: Matt Meese Editor: Trent Woolford Thanks for watching The Sea Snake
Views: 571726 Studio C
The Deadly But Beautiful Sea Snakes of the Pacific
 
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This is a banded sea snake, observed off the South Pacific island of Niue. While rarely needed, sea snake antivenom is made from the blood of horses. #oceanx #seasnake #Niue
Views: 3731 OceanX
Born to Be Wild: Observing the Banded Sea Krait on a snake island
 
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Aired: (September 23, 2018): Doc Nielsen goes to Minalayo, a snake island in Masbate, to observe the behavior of one of the most venomous snakes in the world, the Banded Sea Krait. Why do the snakes gather in this island and what measures are the authorities implementing to preserve this area? Watch ‘Born to be Wild’ every Sunday, hosted by Doctor Nielsen Donato and Doctor Ferds Recio. Subscribe to us! http://www.youtube.com/user/GMAPublicAffairs?sub_confirmation=1 Find your favorite GMA Public Affairs and GMA News TV shows online! http://www.gmanews.tv/publicaffairs http://www.gmanews.tv/newstv
Views: 526083 GMA Public Affairs
When Sea Snakes ATTACK! - Sailing New Caledonia's West Coast ~ Adventures of Sprout  Ep7
 
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Clare is attacked by a sea snake, Jesse gets another epic surf and Sprout continues sailing up the west coast of New Caledonia. As a young Aussie couple sailing the world we love adventure, sailing, travel, beaches, surfing, free diving and fishing. Adventures of Sprout social media: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2FA... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SYsprout/?re... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adventures_... Blog: http://adventuresofapiratewife.com Music: Travellin' - Jordan Merick Facebook.com/jordanmerrickmusic Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/artist/0ahcACj3s9GCO561Tja3Mj Insta: @jordanmerrick18 Twitter: @jordanmerrick18 Crazy For You (feat. Andrea Kirwin) - Single by Bearfoot https://itunes.apple.com/au/album/crazy-for-you-feat-andrea-kirwin-single/id1265912052 http://www.facebook.com/bearfootaustralia http://soundcloud.com/bearfootaustralia http://instagram.com/bearfootmusic https://open.spotify.com/user/bearfootmusic Vagabond- Jessikah https://m.facebook.com/JessikahMusic/ https://www.triplejunearthed.com/artist/jessikah U Know Me - aaya www.soundcloud.com/aayubeats Thank you to all the talented Aussie musicians who let us use their amazing songs.
Views: 14675 Adventures of Sprout

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